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Competitive Trace Theory: A Role for the Hippocampus in Contextual Interference during Retrieval

Overview of attention for article published in Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience, January 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#29 of 1,691)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
blogs
4 blogs
twitter
18 tweeters
googleplus
13 Google+ users
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
29 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
226 Mendeley
Title
Competitive Trace Theory: A Role for the Hippocampus in Contextual Interference during Retrieval
Published in
Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience, January 2013
DOI 10.3389/fnbeh.2013.00107
Pubmed ID
Authors

Michael A. Yassa, Zachariah M. Reagh, Yassa, Michael A., Reagh, Zachariah M.

Abstract

Much controversy exists regarding the role of the hippocampus in retrieval. The two dominant and competing accounts have been the Standard Model of Systems Consolidation (SMSC) and Multiple Trace Theory (MTT), which specifically make opposing predictions as to the necessity of the hippocampus for retrieval of remote memories. Under SMSC, memories eventually become independent of the hippocampus as they become more reliant on cortical connectivity, and thus the hippocampus is not required for retrieval of remote memories, only recent ones. MTT on the other hand claims that the hippocampus is always required no matter the age of the memory. We argue that this dissociation may be too simplistic, and a continuum model may be better suited to address the role of the hippocampus in retrieval of remote memories. Such a model is presented here with the main function of the hippocampus during retrieval being "recontextualization," or the reconstruction of memory using overlapping traces. As memories get older, they are decontextualized due to competition among partially overlapping traces and become more semantic and reliant on neocortical storage. In this framework dubbed the Competitive Trace Theory (CTT), consolidation events that lead to the strengthening of memories enhance conceptual knowledge (semantic memory) at the expense of contextual details (episodic memory). As a result, remote memories are more likely to have a stronger semantic representation. At the same time, remote memories are also more likely to include illusory details. The CTT is a novel candidate model that may provide some resolution to the memory consolidation debate.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 18 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 226 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 5 2%
Canada 3 1%
United States 3 1%
Netherlands 2 <1%
France 2 <1%
Ghana 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Chile 1 <1%
Other 2 <1%
Unknown 205 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 69 31%
Student > Master 43 19%
Researcher 41 18%
Student > Bachelor 26 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 5%
Other 36 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 97 43%
Neuroscience 36 16%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 33 15%
Unspecified 21 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 15 7%
Other 24 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 81. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 February 2016.
All research outputs
#150,145
of 11,411,632 outputs
Outputs from Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience
#29
of 1,691 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,002
of 136,924 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience
#1
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,411,632 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,691 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 136,924 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them