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From speech to thought: the neuronal basis of cognitive units in non-experimental, real-life communication investigated using ECoG

Overview of attention for article published in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, June 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
5 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
googleplus
2 Google+ users
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
17 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
73 Mendeley
Title
From speech to thought: the neuronal basis of cognitive units in non-experimental, real-life communication investigated using ECoG
Published in
Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, June 2014
DOI 10.3389/fnhum.2014.00383
Pubmed ID
Authors

Johanna Derix, Olga Iljina, Johanna Weiske, Andreas Schulze-Bonhage, Ad Aertsen, Tonio Ball

Abstract

Exchange of thoughts by means of expressive speech is fundamental to human communication. However, the neuronal basis of real-life communication in general, and of verbal exchange of ideas in particular, has rarely been studied until now. Here, our aim was to establish an approach for exploring the neuronal processes related to cognitive "idea" units (IUs) in conditions of non-experimental speech production. We investigated whether such units corresponding to single, coherent chunks of speech with syntactically-defined borders, are useful to unravel the neuronal mechanisms underlying real-world human cognition. To this aim, we employed simultaneous electrocorticography (ECoG) and video recordings obtained in pre-neurosurgical diagnostics of epilepsy patients. We transcribed non-experimental, daily hospital conversations, identified IUs in transcriptions of the patients' speech, classified the obtained IUs according to a previously-proposed taxonomy focusing on memory content, and investigated the underlying neuronal activity. In each of our three subjects, we were able to collect a large number of IUs which could be assigned to different functional IU subclasses with a high inter-rater agreement. Robust IU-onset-related changes in spectral magnitude could be observed in high gamma frequencies (70-150 Hz) on the inferior lateral convexity and in the superior temporal cortex regardless of the IU content. A comparison of the topography of these responses with mouth motor and speech areas identified by electrocortical stimulation showed that IUs might be of use for extraoperative mapping of eloquent cortex (average sensitivity: 44.4%, average specificity: 91.1%). High gamma responses specific to memory-related IU subclasses were observed in the inferior parietal and prefrontal regions. IU-based analysis of ECoG recordings during non-experimental communication thus elicits topographically- and functionally-specific effects. We conclude that segmentation of spontaneous real-world speech in linguistically-motivated units is a promising strategy for elucidating the neuronal basis of mental processing during non-experimental communication.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 73 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 3 4%
France 1 1%
Italy 1 1%
Australia 1 1%
Sweden 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Unknown 65 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 27%
Researcher 17 23%
Professor 6 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 7%
Student > Bachelor 4 5%
Other 11 15%
Unknown 10 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 13 18%
Psychology 10 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 11%
Engineering 8 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 10%
Other 13 18%
Unknown 14 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 50. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 December 2019.
All research outputs
#589,864
of 19,762,584 outputs
Outputs from Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
#291
of 6,403 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,752
of 201,546 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
#17
of 235 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,762,584 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,403 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 201,546 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 235 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.