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Enhancing the ecological validity of fMRI memory research using virtual reality

Overview of attention for article published in Frontiers in Neuroscience, June 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (60th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (69th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters
reddit
2 Redditors

Citations

dimensions_citation
1 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
51 Mendeley
Title
Enhancing the ecological validity of fMRI memory research using virtual reality
Published in
Frontiers in Neuroscience, June 2018
DOI 10.3389/fnins.2018.00408
Pubmed ID
Authors

Reggente, Nicco, Essoe, Joey Ka-Yee, Aghajan, Zahra M, Tavakoli, Amir Vala, McGuire, Joseph F, Suthana, Nanthia A, Rissman, Jesse, Essoe, Joey K.-Y., Aghajan, Zahra M., Tavakoli, Amir V., McGuire, Joseph F., Suthana, Nanthia A.

Abstract

Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a powerful research tool to understand the neural underpinnings of human memory. However, as memory is known to be context-dependent, differences in contexts between naturalistic settings and the MRI scanner environment may potentially confound neuroimaging findings. Virtual reality (VR) provides a unique opportunity to mitigate this issue by allowing memories to be formed and/or retrieved within immersive, navigable, visuospatial contexts. This can enhance the ecological validity of task paradigms, while still ensuring that researchers maintain experimental control over critical aspects of the learning and testing experience. This mini-review surveys the growing body of fMRI studies that have incorporated VR to address critical questions about human memory. These studies have adopted a variety of approaches, including presenting research participants with VR experiences in the scanner, asking participants to retrieve information that they had previously acquired in a VR environment, or identifying neural correlates of behavioral metrics obtained through VR-based tasks performed outside the scanner. Although most such studies to date have focused on spatial or navigational memory, we also discuss the promise of VR in aiding other areas of memory research and facilitating research into clinical disorders.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 51 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 51 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 11 22%
Student > Master 7 14%
Researcher 7 14%
Student > Bachelor 6 12%
Other 6 12%
Other 14 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 19 37%
Unspecified 13 25%
Neuroscience 11 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 4%
Other 4 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 June 2018.
All research outputs
#3,876,035
of 13,116,247 outputs
Outputs from Frontiers in Neuroscience
#1,730
of 4,395 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#102,730
of 270,897 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Frontiers in Neuroscience
#13
of 42 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,116,247 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,395 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,897 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 42 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.