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“Doctor” or “darling”? Decoding the communication partner from ECoG of the anterior temporal lobe during non-experimental, real-life social interaction

Overview of attention for article published in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, January 2012
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Title
“Doctor” or “darling”? Decoding the communication partner from ECoG of the anterior temporal lobe during non-experimental, real-life social interaction
Published in
Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, January 2012
DOI 10.3389/fnhum.2012.00251
Pubmed ID
Authors

Johanna Derix, Olga Iljina, Andreas Schulze-Bonhage, Ad Aertsen, Tonio Ball

Abstract

Human brain processes underlying real-life social interaction in everyday situations have been difficult to study and have, until now, remained largely unknown. Here, we investigated whether electrocorticography (ECoG) recorded for pre-neurosurgical diagnostics during the daily hospital life of epilepsy patients could provide a way to elucidate the neural correlates of non-experimental social interaction. We identified time periods in which patients were involved in conversations with either their respective life partners (Condition 1; C1) or attending physicians (Condition 2; C2). These two conditions can be expected to differentially involve subfunctions of social interaction which have been associated with activity in the anterior temporal lobe (ATL), including the temporal pole (TP). Therefore, we specifically focused on ECoG recordings from this brain region and investigated spectral power modulations in the alpha (8-12 Hz) and theta (3-5 Hz) frequency ranges, which have been previously assumed to play an important role in the processing of social interaction. We hypothesized that brain activity in this region might be sensitive to differences in the two interaction situations and tested whether these differences can be detected by single-trial decoding. Condition-specific effects in both theta and alpha bands were observed: the left and right TP exclusively showed increased power in C1 compared to C2, whereas more posterior parts of the ATL exhibited similar (C1 > C2) and also contrary (C2 > C1) effects. Single-trial decoding accuracies for classification of these effects were highly above chance. Our findings demonstrate that it is possible to study the neural correlates of human social interaction in non-experimental conditions. Decoding the identity of the communication partner and adjusting the speech output accordingly may be useful in the emerging field of brain-machine interfacing for restoration of expressive speech.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 91 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 3 3%
United States 2 2%
France 1 1%
Singapore 1 1%
Australia 1 1%
Unknown 83 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 26 29%
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 22%
Student > Bachelor 10 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 10%
Student > Master 5 5%
Other 10 11%
Unknown 11 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 16 18%
Neuroscience 15 16%
Psychology 12 13%
Engineering 9 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 7%
Other 17 19%
Unknown 16 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 September 2012.
All research outputs
#14,346,748
of 21,338,376 outputs
Outputs from Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
#5,038
of 6,722 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#93,360
of 149,082 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,338,376 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,722 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.5. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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