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In search of the jüdische Typus: a proposed benchmark to test the genetic basis of Jewishness challenges notions of “Jewish biomarkers”

Overview of attention for article published in Frontiers in Genetics, August 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
23 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages
video
1 video uploader

Readers on

mendeley
11 Mendeley
Title
In search of the jüdische Typus: a proposed benchmark to test the genetic basis of Jewishness challenges notions of “Jewish biomarkers”
Published in
Frontiers in Genetics, August 2016
DOI 10.3389/fgene.2016.00141
Pubmed ID
Authors

Elhaik, Eran, Eran Elhaik

Abstract

The debate as to whether Jewishness is a biological trait inherent from an "authentic" "Jewish type" (jüdische Typus) ancestor or a system of beliefs has been raging for over two centuries. While the accumulated biological and anthropological evidence support the latter argument, recent genetic findings, bolstered by the direct-to-consumer genetic industry, purport to identify Jews or quantify one's Jewishness from genomic data. To test the merit of claims that Jews and non-Jews are genetically distinguishable, we propose a benchmark where genomic data of Jews and non-Jews are hybridized over two generations and the observed and predicted Jewishness of the terminal offspring according to either the Orthodox religious law (Halacha) or the Israeli Law of Return are compared. Members of academia, the public, and 23andMe were invited to use the benchmark to test claims that Jews are genetically distinct from non-Jews. Here, we report the findings from these trials. We also compare the genomic similarity of ∼300 individuals from nearly thirty Afro-Eurasian Jewish communities to a simulated jüdische Typus population. The results are discussed in light of modern trends in the genetics of Jews and related fields and provide a tentative answer to the ageless question "who is a Jew?"

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 23 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 9%
Unknown 10 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 3 27%
Researcher 3 27%
Student > Bachelor 2 18%
Lecturer 1 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 9%
Other 1 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 64%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 9%
Engineering 1 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 22. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 July 2018.
All research outputs
#553,289
of 11,473,233 outputs
Outputs from Frontiers in Genetics
#85
of 2,129 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#21,904
of 263,726 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Frontiers in Genetics
#3
of 53 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,473,233 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,129 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,726 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 53 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.